Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. is the first international fraternal organization founded on the campus of a historically black college. It was founded on the campus of Howard University which is located in Washington, D.C. The founders were three undergraduates -- Edgar Amos Love, Oscar James Cooper and Frank Coleman. Joining them was their faculty adviser, Ernest Everett Just.

Alpha Chapter was organized with fourteen charter members on December 15, 1911. Love, Cooper and Coleman were elected the chapter's first Basileus, Keeper of Records, and Keeper of Seals, respectively. On March 8, 1912, the previously submitted fraternity constitution was rejected by the Howard University Faculty Council. The Faculty Council proposed to accept the fraternity as a local but not a national organization. The fraternity refused acceptance as a strictly local organization.

"Friendship is essential to the soul" was selected as the Fraternity motto. Manhood, Scholarship, Perseverance and Uplift were adopted as Cardinal Principles. 

Today, there are many notable Omega Men recognized as leaders in the arts, the sciences, academics, athletics, business, civil rights, education, government, and science sectors at the local, national and international

level.


Since its humble beginnings on the Howard University campus, the Omega Psi Phi fraternity continues to be on the front line, leveraging its power, influence and more than 100 years of commitment to

the uplift of our people and our communities.